Stoney Ridge Farms- A Wonderful Fall Destination.

CIMG0032If you or your family have never visited Stoney Ridge Farms in Everson, this is the year. After 25 years this will be the family farms last Fall season. Open every Thursday, Friday and Saturday in October Stoney Ridge Farms has Fall Activities for everyone. They boast the largest pumpkin patch in all of Whatcom County, hay rides, farm animal viewing, corn maze, cafe with fresh apple cider and so much more.

My family has made Stoney Ridge a yearly tradition and we often spend the whole day at the farm. We love to walk in the barn and check out the piglets, goats, horses and donkeys. There is an abundance of animals to see and some that you can even feed. The pies from the cafe are wonderful and I highly recommend the carmel apple pie. We also purchase all our fall decorations from the farm each year including a large variety of small gourds and large pumpkins, they have it all.Stoney Ridge House

Every year we visit the farm we leave with wonderful memories, stomach’s full of fresh baked pie and a whole bunch of pumpkins and gourds to decorate our home.

During the month of December the farm will be open  to the public and is the go to spot to pick out your fresh cut Christmas tree from there large farm.  The barn is also home to a live animal nativity, holiday crafts and baked goods.

If you are interested in heading out to Stoney Ridge Farms they are located at 2902 Van Dyk Rd in Everson. From Bellingham head North of the Guide Meridian, East on the Pole Rd, and then turn left onto the Van Dyk Rd. Stoney Ridge  Farms will be on your right hand side with parking on your left. Opening day is Thursday October 3rd. I will do another post about the farm with more photos after my annual visit this year.

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Holiday Home Safety Tips

Our Christmas tree this year

Our Christmas tree this year

The holiday season is well upon us and no matter what holiday or tradition your celebrate it’s always important to remember some helpful safety tips. Fire is a common concern during the holidays and the two most common culprits of holiday fires or lighting and the Christmas tree.

Below are some tips from local home inspector Jefferson Livingston with Pillar to Post Home Inspection Services on keeping your Christmas Tree and Holiday lighting safe this season.

Christmas Tree Safety Tips:

  • If you’re buying a live Christmas tree, buy a freshly cut one that is not already dried out.
  • Place tree away from ignition sources like fire places, heaters, candles, radiators and combustible materials.
  • Water your tree regularly to keep it fresh.
  • Buy fire resistant tree. Remember that fire resistance does not mean that the tree won’t catch fire, it only means that the tree will resist burning and should extinguish quickly.
  • Avoid lead-based materials when cutting or decorating your tree – they are hazardous when ingested by children.
  • Avoid sharp objects when decorating your tree.
  • Avoid tree decorations that may break.

Lighting Safety Tips:

  • Check the label when buying lights to make sure that it conforms to safety standards.
  • Don’t put electric lights on a metallic surface/object – it may charge the object and electrocute those who touch it.
  • If putting lights outdoors, make sure that the light is certified for outdoor use.
  • Avoid potential shock by plugging all outdoor electric decorations into circuits with ground fault circuit interrupters.
  • Always have smoke alarms.

Holidays from The Johnson Team Real Estate

Holiday and Winter Home Fire Safety Tips

Bellingham Real Estate Home Tips

Holiday Home and Winter Fire Safety Tips

Jefferson Livingston with Pillar to Post Home Inspection services is once again sharing some wonderful tips for us this holiday season. Below are some tips he provided me via email on staying safe this holiday season.

Residential fires take their toll every day, every year, in lost lives and destroyed property. The fact is that many conditions that cause house fires can be avoided or prevented by homeowners. Taking the time for some simple precautions, preventive inspections, and concrete planning can help prevent fire in the home — and can even save your life should disaster strike.

All electrical devices including lamps, appliances, and electronics should be checked for frayed cords, loose or broken plugs, and exposed wiring. Never run electrical wires under carpet or rugs as this creates a fire hazard.

Wood-burning fireplaces should be cleaned by a professional chimney sweep each year to prevent a dangerous buildup of creosote, which can cause a flash fire in the chimney. Cracks in masonry chimneys should be repaired, and spark arresters inspected to ensure they are in good condition and free of debris.

When using space heaters, keep them away from beds and bedding, curtains, papers — anything flammable. Always follow the manufacturer’s instructions for use. Space heaters should not be left unattended or where a child or pet could knock them over.

Use smoke detectors with fresh batteries unless they are hard-wired to your home’s electrical system. Smoke detectors should be installed high on walls or on ceilings on every level of the home and inside each bedroom. Statistics show that nearly 60% of home fire fatalities occur in homes without working smoke alarms. Many municipalities now require the use of working smoke detectors in both single and multi-family residences.

Children should not have access to or be allowed to play with matches, lighters, or candles. Flammable materials such as gasoline or kerosene should be stored outside the house.

Kitchen fires know no season. Grease spills, items left unattended on the stove or in the oven, and food left in toasters or toaster ovens can catch fire quickly. Don’t wear loose fitting clothing, especially with long sleeves, around the stove. Handles of pots and pans should be turned away from the front of the stove to prevent accidental contact. Keep an all-purpose fire extinguisher within easy reach.

Have an escape plan. This is one of the most important measures you can take to prevent death in a fire. Your local fire department can provide detailed recommendations on escape planning and preparedness. In addition, all family members should know how to dial 911 in case of a fire or other emergency.

Live Christmas trees should be kept in a water-filled stand and checked daily for dehydration. Needles should not easily break off a freshly-cut tree. Brown needles or lots of fallen needles indicate a dangerously dried-out tree, which should be discarded immediately. Always use nonflammable decorations in the home, and never use lights on a dried-out tree.

Candles should be placed in stable holders and placed away from curtains, drafts, pets, and children. Never leave candles unattended, even for a short time.

Christmas or other holiday lights should be checked for fraying or broken wires and plugs. Follow the manufacturer’s guidelines when joining two or more strands together, as a fire hazard could result from overload. Enjoy your indoor holiday lighting only while someone is home, and turn them off before going to bed at night.

Thanks Jefferson and Pillar to Post for helping to keep us safe this Holiday Season!

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